EppsNet Archive: Andy Warhol

MOCA and the Broad

11 Sep 2016 /

My niece and nephew were visiting from Texas . . . my niece in particular wanted to see the Infinity Mirrored Room installation at the Broad, so off we went.

(Scroll down for photos.)

Unless you reserve tickets well in advance, entry to the Broad is handled via a standby line, which, when we showed up Saturday morning, was about an hour wait, i.e., the museum opened at 10 a.m. and we got in about 11:00.

Because the standby line is in direct sunlight, Broad staff thoughtfully hand out umbrellas to anyone in the queue who wants one. (They do ask for the umbrellas back when you enter.)

The Infinity Mirrored Room is an experiential artwork . . . one visitor at a time enters the room for 45 seconds. It requires a separate reservation which you can make, pending availability, after entering the museum.

Once you get signed up with your name and cell phone, you get a text when it’s your turn to see the room. Our reservation came with a wait time of 4 hours and 35 minutes. Good to know.

That gave us enough time to take in the rest of the museum, and walk across the street to MOCA and take in their entire offering.

A couple of differences between the Broad and MOCA:

  1. MOCA is more museum-y. It makes you feel like whispering. The Broad is more open, playful and fun.
  2. Admission to the Broad is free. MOCA costs 12 bucks.

After wrapping up MOCA and heading back to the Broad, we were able to get an update on our Infinity Mirrored Room wait time. We were prepped to get some lunch and come back if we had to wait out the full 4-1/2 hours, but no: only 15 minutes left! Total wait was only about 3 hours.

Here’s a few photos:


A Good Picture

19 May 2013 /
Andy Warhol

My idea of a good picture is one that’s in focus and of a famous person.

— Andy Warhol

They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself. — Andy Warhol


Boring

4 Jun 2011 /

Of course, what I think is boring must not be the same as what other people think is, since I could never stand to watch all the most popular action shows on TV, because they’re essentially the same plots and the same shots and the same cuts over and over again. Apparently, most people love watching the same basic thing, as long as the details are different.

— Andy Warhol

Warhol’s Prophecy

4 Jun 2002 /

I wish Andy Warhol was around to see that his most famous prophecy — that everyone will eventually enjoy 15 minutes of fame — came true with a vengeance. Talk shows opened the stage door to trailer park America, and now game shows are celebrating anyone who knows the capital of Spain or who marries a potential wife-beater on camera . . .

— Michael Musto, Village Voice