EppsNet Archive: Photos

I Think the Camera’s Upside Down

22 Feb 2014 /

Upside down

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L.A. Arboretum

17 Feb 2014 /
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Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, CA

17 Feb 2014 /

This grinning nitwit is standing on the deck of the Stadium Club:

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Japan, Day 5: Snow Monkeys, Yudanaka

26 Dec 2013 /

Snow Monkeys

Jigokudani Monkey Park (Jigokudani Yaen Koen) is in Yamanouchi, Shimotakai District, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. It is part of the Joshinetsu Kogen National Park (locally known as Shigakogen), and is located in the valley of the Yokoyu-River, in the northern part of the prefecture. The name Jigokudani, meaning “Hell’s Valley”, is due to the steam and boiling water that bubbles out of small crevices in the frozen ground, surrounded by steep cliffs and formidably cold and hostile forests.

The heavy snowfalls (snow covers the ground for 4 months a year), an elevation of 850 metres, and being only accessible via a narrow two kilometre footpath through the forest, keep it uncrowded despite being relatively well-known.

It is famous for its large population of wild Japanese Macaques (Macaca fuscata), more commonly referred to as Snow Monkeys, that go to the valley during the winter, foraging elsewhere in the national park during the warmer months. Starting in 1963, the monkeys descend from the steep cliffs and forest to sit in the warm waters of the onsen (hotsprings), and return to the security of the forests in the evenings.

Wikipedia

Today we ventured into the cold and hostile forests above Nagano to visit the legendary snow monkeys.

The monkeys aren’t friendly or unfriendly. They don’t approach you but they don’t try to stay away from you either. They might sit still for a selfie but they won’t smile.

Snow Monkey

Snow Monkey

Snow Monkeys in Hot Springs (Onsen)

Snow Monkeys in Hot Springs (Onsen)

Yudanaka

We stayed the night at a ryokan (bed and breakfast) in nearby Yudanaka Onsen, a hot spring resort, where we enjoyed traditional accomodations, including a multi-course Japanese dinner and sleeping on the floor (on tatami mats and futons).

Our room didn’t have beds but it did have a flat-screen TV. There’s a limit to how much deprivation up with which a traveler is willing to put.

Traditional Japanese Meal

Traditional Japanese Meal

Onsen

Onsen

Traditional Japanese Accomodations

Traditional Japanese Accomodations


Japan, Day 2: Kinkakuji Temple, Nishijin Textile Center, Tea Ceremony, Bullet Train, Atami

23 Dec 2013 /

Kinkakuji Temple

Kinkaku-ji (lit. “Temple of the Golden Pavilion”), officially named Rokuon-ji (lit. “Deer Garden Temple”), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan.

The site of Kinkaku-ji was originally a villa called Kitayama-dai, belonging to a powerful statesman, Saionji Kintsune. Kinkaku-ji’s history dates to 1397, when the villa was purchased from the Saionji family by Shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, and transformed into the Kinkaku-ji complex. When Yoshimitsu died, the building was converted into a Zen temple by his son, according to his wishes.

During the Onin war, all of the buildings in the complex aside from the pavilion were burned down. On July 2, 1950, at 2:30 am, the pavilion was burned down by a 22-year-old novice monk, Hayashi Yoken, who then attempted suicide on the Daimon-ji hill behind the building. He survived, and was subsequently taken into custody. The monk was sentenced to seven years in prison, but was released because of mental illnesses (persecution complex and schizophrenia) on September 29, 1955; he died of tuberculosis shortly after in 1956.

The present pavilion structure dates from 1955, when it was rebuilt.

— Wikipedia

Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion

Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion


Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion

Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion


Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion

Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion


Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion

Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion


Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion

Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion


Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion

Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion


Kinkakuji Temple

Kinkakuji Temple


Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion

Kinkakuji Temple: Golden Pavilion


Kinkakuji Temple

Kinkakuji Temple


Kinkakuji Temple

Kinkakuji Temple


Kinkakuji Temple

Kinkakuji Temple


Kinkakuji Temple

Kinkakuji Temple

Nishijin Textile Center

Nishijin is a district in Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan, and (by extension) a traditional textile produced there, more narrowly referred to as Nishijin-ori (Nishijin fabric).

Nishijin weaving was created in Kyoto over 1200 years ago by using many different types of colored yarns and weaving them together into decorative designs. These specialized procedures are tedious, but necessary to obtain the spectacular design needed to ensure the quality of Nishijin weaving.

— Wikipedia

What the blurb above means is that images and patterns are not dyed after the fabric has been produced, the yarn is dyed before weaving, which yields the finest quality but is much harder to create.

Kimono Show

Kimono Show


Kimono Show

Kimono Show


Kimono Show

Kimono Show

Tea Ceremony

We participated in a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, involving the preparation and presentation of matcha, a powdered green tea.

Fun fact: You don’t enter the tea room through that big opening in the front. You sort of crawl in through a small door on the right-hand side, which you can’t see in the photo. There’s a traditional reason for this, something to do with samurai not bringing swords to the tea ceremony (they won’t fit through the little door), but in modern times, it seems a bit of an unnecessary ordeal.

Tea Room

Tea Room

Bullet Train

We took the Shinkansen (bullet train) from Kyoto to Atami. These trains run on time. If the board says the train leaves at 3:12, it leaves at 3:12. Don’t show up at 3:13 and wonder where your train went.

Bullet Train

Bullet Train


Bullet Train

Bullet Train

Atami

In Atami, we enjoyed a traditional Japanese dinner, so traditional that our guide was unsure of what a couple of the items were. Atami is on the eastern coast and has a spectacular fireworks display that they shoot off over the bay.

Traditional Japanese Dinner

Traditional Japanese Dinner


Atami Fireworks

Atami Fireworks

Atami Fireworks

Atami Fireworks

Atami Fireworks

Atami Fireworks


Animal Cruelty

25 Aug 2013 /
Lightning at the Dog Park

Hi everybody! It’s me, Lightning!

I’m so mad! The guy behind us in the Starbucks drive-thru lane is taking pictures of himself and his dog but he’s not SHOWING the pictures to the dog!

YOU HAVE TO SHOW THE PICTURES TO THE DOG! GRRRRRRR!

— Lightning paw


Pictures of Food

7 Aug 2013 /
"The Basket of Apples" by Paul Cézanne

“The Basket of Apples” by Paul Cézanne

Years ago, if you wanted to show your friends a picture of your food, you’d have to break out the palette and the easel and paint one. Time-consuming!

Nowadays, with the likes of Facebook and Instagram, it’s just point and click!

Another way life gets better and better thanks to computers . . .


Joyce Carol Oates Gets Slammed

11 Jul 2013 /

http://twitchy.com/2013/07/05/joyce-carol-oates-suggests-radical-islam-fosters-rape-culture-gets-slammed-as-bigot/

EppsNet stands behind Joyce Carol Oates in this Twitstorm, in opposition to those who think that while raping women may be a bad thing, what’s really deplorable is freedom of thought and questioning theocracy. In solidarity, we publish a couple of previously unseen (because they’re terrible) photos of the two of us taken with Mark Twain in the Doe Library at UC Berkeley.

Joyce Carol Oates Mark Twain bench


A Good Picture

19 May 2013 /
Andy Warhol

My idea of a good picture is one that’s in focus and of a famous person.

— Andy Warhol

The Lightning-Bug and the Lightning

20 Apr 2013 /
Mark Twain

This picture was taken just after I said to Mark Twain, “The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter — it’s the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.”

And Twain said, “That’s a good one! I’ve got to write that down!”

Actually, the Twain statue is just inside the main entrance of Doe Library at UC Berkeley. I asked the nerdy-looking Asian girl at the front desk, “Who’s the guy on the bench?” She stared at me for a second. “Kidding,” I said.

“At first, I thought it was Albert Einstein,” she said, “so it doesn’t surprise me when people don’t know.”


Celebrity Photos

7 Apr 2013 /

We went to a comedy show at the Irvine Improv on Friday night. Gilbert Gottfried was the headliner. I happened to recognize one of the comedians, David Angelo, sitting in the back of the room before the show — I’m a fan of his work on Twitter and YouTube — and he was gracious enough to pose for a photo taken by my wife:

Me and David Angelo

Now you might say that’s not a very good photo, but it is recognizable as two human beings, which is more than you could say before I spent an hour working it over in Photoshop . . .


Napping in Sunshine

8 Jan 2013 /

Napping in Sunshine


Pug with Santa

18 Dec 2012 /

Pug with Santa


I Love Piano Music!

28 Oct 2012 /

Hi everybody! It’s me, Lightning!

I love listening to piano music! Whenever someone at my house tickles the ivories, I like to curl up next to the bench and listen!

Lightning by the piano

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Sleeping Pugs

20 Oct 2012 /
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Whenever I Look Down From the Dinner Table, This is What I See

18 Oct 2012 /

Lightning

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The Flash Made Me Blink! Can You Take Another One?

18 Oct 2012 /

I blinked!

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Pug Walker

13 Oct 2012 /
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Western Motel in Pink

3 Oct 2012 /
Western Motel in Pink by Jeep Novak!

A photo by Jeep Novak! on Flickr


Pug with Glockenspiel

29 Sep 2012 /
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