EppsNet Archive: Propaganda

A Fake News Taxonomy: 7 Types of Mis- and Disinformation

9 Sep 2017 /

First Draft makes an interesting effort to classify different types of misinformation (the inadvertent sharing of false information) and disinformation (the deliberate creation and sharing of information known to be false), based on the type of content, the motivations of those who create the content and the ways that content is disseminated

Here are the categories they came up with, in descending order of intent to deceive:

  • Fabricated Content: New content that is 100% false
  • Manipulated Content: Genuine information or imagery is manipulated
  • Imposter Content: Impersonation of genuine sources
  • False Context: Genuine content is shared with false contextual information
  • Misleading Content: Misleading use of information to frame an issue/individual
  • False Connection: Headlines, visuals or captions don’t support the content
  • Satire or Parody: No intention to cause harm but potential to fool

We used to have the Five W’s: who, what, when, where and why. Now we have the Eight P’s:

  • Poor journalism
  • Parody
  • To provoke or to “punk”
  • Passion
  • Partisanship
  • Profit
  • Political influence
  • Propaganda

Watch Out for the Gospel of the Times

14 Apr 2013 /

everything is permitted
absolute freedom of movement
that is, without leaving the cage
2+2 doesn’t make 4:
once it made 4 but
today nothing is known in this regard

— Nicanor Parra, “Watch Out for the Gospel of the Times”


Fame and Fortune Are Within Your Grasp

11 Sep 2012 /

Select a topic about which you have little information but many prejudices, such as “Whither Modern Youth?” “The Menace of Federal Encroachments on American Freedom,” “The National Association of Manufacturers: A Threat to Democracy,” “Big Unions: A Threat to Free Enterprise,” “What’s Wrong with Modern Women,” “Let’s Cut the Fads and Frills from Education,” or “The South: Yesterday and Today,” and write a one-thousand-word essay consisting solely of sweeping generalizations, broad judgments, and unfounded inferences. Use plenty of “loaded” words. Knock off five points (out of a possible 100) for each verifiable fact used. If you can consistently score 95 or better on all these and other such topics, and your grammar and spelling are plausible, leave your present job. Or quit school. Fame and fortune are within your grasp.