EppsNet Archive: Advertising

A Brutally Honest Tagline

18 Mar 2016 /


Does Anyone Else See a Problem Here?

9 Oct 2015 /

LA MER


25 Concepts to Facilitate Judicious Use of Psychiatric Drugs

20 Sep 2015 /

I’m not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night . . . I also took a Colgate University class on medicating for mental health and judicious use of psychiatric drugs.

Pills
  1. A psychiatric medication is only one useful tool among a collection of useful tools. Remember to also consider non-drug options for therapy.
  2. The benefits of psychiatric medications are always accompanied by risk. Become familiar with the potential risk of your medication. Be alert to potential risks that might be intolerable to you.
  3. Establishing a diagnosis is a difficult and imperfect task, but it establishes the starting point for determining which treatments are appropriate.
  4. Engage your physician or a psychologist in a dialogue regarding the structure of your treatment program. Be an active participant in establishing the structure of that program. Having confidence that your treatment program will work is important for its success.
  5. Become familiar with the vocabulary of psychopharmacology and with some basic principles of psychopharmacology. It will improve your ability to communicate with your physician or therapist.
  6. Be forthcoming and candid with your physician or therapist when working to establish realistic goals for your use of psychiatric medication. These goals should include the meaningful improvement of symptoms and side effects that are acceptable to you.
  7. A treatment program should aim to not only produce meaningful improvement of symptoms but also should include a plan to prevent relapse.
  8. A psychiatric medication is limited in its effectiveness for improving a problem that has biological, psychological, and social characteristics.
  9. Ask whether the use of your recommended psychiatric medication is supported by published evidence or is an off-label prescription based upon educated guesswork. If your prescribing physician doesn’t know the answer to that question tell him or her to find out for you.
  10. Remind yourself that a psychiatric medication will alter the neurochemistry of your brain and that the effects of medication on the brain can persist and may be permanent.
  11. The ideal dosage of a psychiatric medication is the smallest dosage that is able to provide meaningful relief of symptoms.
  12. Fulfill your responsibilities for ensuring the success of your treatment program. Be fully cooperative regarding instructions for using medication and for taking the advice of the therapist.
  13. Remember that counseling, psychotherapy, or behavioral therapy may enhance the effectiveness of a psychiatric medication.
  14. Remember also that a psychiatric medication may enable counseling, psychotherapy, or behavioral therapy to be more effective.
  15. Newer psychiatric medications are often more expensive medications despite the fact that those newer drugs may not be more effective than older medications.
  16. Newer psychiatric medications have been used for a shorter period of time and by fewer people than older medications. This fact increases the likelihood that newer medications might bring unpleasant surprises.
  17. Herbal remedies and dietary supplements may or may not be effective or safe and very few of those remedies have been studied in well-designed experiments to evaluate their effectiveness and their relative safety.
  18. If possible, avoid using multiple medications in order to minimize the possibility of harmful drug interactions.
  19. Direct-to-consumer advertising of psychiatric medication is principally intended to get you to buy a product. That product may or may not be in the best interest of your own physiological, emotional and psychological well-being.
  20. Be aware that your health insurance provider may structure costs to you, the patient, in a way that provides some incentive to use one drug instead of some other drug or to use medication instead of psychotherapy. If possible, try to make the principal goal of your therapy to be the relief of symptoms, not the lowest cost of treatment.
  21. The elderly present special vulnerabilities for psychiatric medications — for example, enhanced sensitivity, likelihood of polypharmacy, or increased risk of falling.
  22. Exposing the young, still-developing brain of a child or adolescent to a potent psychiatric medication risks creating problems for those brains when they reach adulthood.
  23. The recent trend is to rely more upon psychiatric medication than upon non-drug therapies to treat psychopathology. Resist that trend when you are not convinced that medication is the best choice for you or for a member of your family.
  24. The study of brain and behavior is a frontier science. Thus the use of drugs that alter brain neurochemistry to treat psychopathology is based upon an incomplete understanding of brain and behavior.
  25. Because our current understanding of brain and behavior is incomplete, contemporary psychiatric medications are imperfect tools that are clinically useful until we learn enough to develop better tools.

The College Football Playoff is Working

3 Jan 2015 /

Under the old two-team BCS format, the teams that lost the semifinal games — Alabama and Florida State — would likely have played each other in the championship game, while the two winners — Oregon and Ohio State — would likely have been voted out.

Florida State, as the defending champs and only undefeated team, would have been in for sure, while Ohio State would have just as certainly been out. That leaves Alabama and Oregon. One would have had to be dropped and it probably would have been Oregon.

Four teams is still not enough (see TCU’s 42-3 blowout of Mississippi State) to be able to say that none of the teams voted out was good enough to win it.

Also: I am sick unto death of the goddamn Larry Culpepper commercials. Enough of that already.


More People I’m Sick Unto Death Of

3 Jan 2015 /

Larry Culpepper


Rough Layouts Sell the Idea Better Than Polished Ones

29 Nov 2012 /

This was written by an ad man but I can see it applying to other endeavors, like designing a software interface:

Scribbling

If you show a client a highly polished computer layout, he will probably reject it.

There is either too much to worry about or not enough to worry about. They are equally bad.

It is a fait accompli.

There is nothing for him to do. It’s not his work, it’s your work. He doesn’t feel involved.

If he doesn’t like the face of the girl in your rendering, or the style of the trousers on the man on the right, or the choice of the car he’s driving, he’s going to reject it.

He won’t see the big idea. He will look at the girl’s face and think, ‘I don’t like her, this doesn’t feel right.’

It is very difficult for him to imagine anything else if what you show him has such detail.

Show the client a scribble.

Explain it to him, talk him through it, let him use his imagination.

Get him involved.

Because you haven’t shown the exact way it’s going to be, there’s scope to interpret it and develop and change it as you progress.

Work with him rather than confronting him with your idea.


Meeting Ron Artest

19 Mar 2011 /
Ron Artest

My kid and a few of his high school friends are on their way to see Ron Artest at Living Spaces in Irvine. He’s doing a meet and greet from 3:00 to 5:00.

What kind of advertising is that? Those kids don’t have money to buy furniture.


Twitter: 2010-09-12

12 Sep 2010 /
Twitter
  • RT @NikkiGlaser: Tell me I'm not the only one who has to get drunk to look at my checking account. #
  • RT @eddiepepitone: Capitalism's last ad- "Since the nuclear devastation we are slashing prices! Everything Must Go!" #

False Advertising

14 Sep 2009 /

There’s a sign in the Taco Bell/KFC drive-thru advertising a “Value Drink” for 99 cents. It looks like a pretty sweet deal because the cup is at least three feet tall.

“How big is the Value Drink?” I ask the drive-thru voice.

“16 ounces,” she says.

“Really? It looks a lot bigger than that on the sign.”

“It’s a trick,” she says. “That’s not the actual size.”

“In that case,” I say, “just give me a large Diet Pepsi.”