EppsNet Archive: Albert Einstein

Chuck Barris, 1929-2017

22 Mar 2017 /
The Gong Show Chuck Barris 1976.jpg

Chuck Barris was well ahead of his time in recognizing how many Americans are willing to make an ass of themselves on television.

The quote below is from the movie based on his book Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. I don’t know if the quote is actually in the book but I include it here nonetheless . . .

When you are young, your potential is infinite. You might do anything, really. You might be Einstein. You might be DiMaggio. Then you get to an age where what you might be gives way to what you have been. You weren’t Einstein. You weren’t anything.

That’s a bad moment.

RIP Chuck Barris


Are There Any Intelligent People Currently Living?

4 Aug 2014 /

I was at LA Fitness this morning . . . one of the TVs was showing an interview with Jameis Winston on ESPN. Winston is borderline retarded but thinks he’s articulate — a deadly combination.

He’s a very talented athlete. Just show clips of his athletic accomplishments. They’re impressive and fun to watch. Why would anyone want to talk to him or listen to him talk? The interviewer is paid to endure it, I get that, but why foist it on the viewing public? Maybe it’s the train wreck element. It was very painful to watch and yet I couldn’t look away!

Rarely is one person gifted in multiple ways. Some people are great athletes, some people are intelligent and interesting . . . the overlap between the two groups is very small.

Venn diagram: Athletic / Intelligent

Listening to Jameis Winston talk is like watching Milton Friedman take batting practice or Albert Einstein work on his five-step drop.

(I know the Milton Friedman and Albert Einstein references are dated but I’m having trouble thinking of anyone who’s a) highly intelligent; b) well known to the general public; and c) currently alive.)


Marilyn Monroe Was a Size 12 and Einstein Was a Moron

10 Nov 2013 /

I saw this photo today on Facebook with a comment added by the poster: “She was a size 12.”

Marilyn

I’m an empiricist. Maybe “empiricist” is a polite word for what I am. I hate things that don’t make sense.

Marilyn Monroe being a size 12 is one of those bits of misinformation that lives forever because a lot of people would like for it to be true. And yet, anyone who’s ever seen Marilyn Monroe — her full figure — in a movie or photo would notice that she had a very small waist and was obviously NOT a size 12.

So I commented that while Marilyn’s point is well taken, on her worst day she was not a size 12.

The original poster replied, “Of course none of this is verifiable at this point, but your comment does not help empower those who are inspired by this ‘fact,’ no matter how true it is. Point is, girls/women who don’t fit the unrealistic supermodel form need to have something to reinforce a more realistic view of women, and of success. By unnecessarily giving your “correction” about how there is NO WAY someone that hot could be a 12, you are in essence proving my point about how, to men, dress size determines desirability. Such men, as the oppressors and the ones who, undeservedly, create the social values that drive our society, need to be met with some strong and intelligent women who challenge their definition and labeling of women.”

[Insert cuckoo clock sound effects here.]

We can feel better about ourselves without actually losing weight or getting in shape if men would just let us pretend that Marilyn Monroe was a size 12.

Look: if you want to be with guys who like thin girls, then you need to be thin. Otherwise, stop worrying about Marilyn Monroe’s dress size and what other people think about the way you look. And stop blaming men for your problems in life as though “men” is an actual group of people who’ve all agreed to think and act the same way.

In other empowering news, Albert Einstein actually had an IQ of 68. He was a total fucking moron! It’s empowering so it doesn’t have to be true.

P.S. Jessica Siegel (size 12) has posted photos of herself trying to fit into some of Marilyn’s frocks.

Jessica Siegel


EppsNet at the Movies: Confessions of a Dangerous Mind

11 Aug 2013 /

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind

When you are young, your potential is infinite. You might do anything, really. You might be Einstein. You might be DiMaggio. Then you get to an age where what you might be gives way to what you have been. You weren’t Einstein. You weren’t anything.

That’s a bad moment.

Chuck Barris was way ahead of his time in recognizing how many Americans are willing to make an ass of themselves on television.

The tone of the movie is inconsistent — is it a comedy? a thriller? a tragedy? — but it’s entertaining.

Thus: Recommended!

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind

An adaptation of the cult memoir of game show impresario Chuck Barris, in which he purports to have been a CIA hitman.

Director: George Clooney
Cast: Sam Rockwell (Chuck Barris), Drew Barrymore (Penny), George Clooney (Jim Byrd), Julia Roberts (Patricia Watson)

IMDb rating: 7.1 (73,390 votes)


The Lightning-Bug and the Lightning

20 Apr 2013 /
Mark Twain

This picture was taken just after I said to Mark Twain, “The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter — it’s the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.”

And Twain said, “That’s a good one! I’ve got to write that down!”

Actually, the Twain statue is just inside the main entrance of Doe Library at UC Berkeley. I asked the nerdy-looking Asian girl at the front desk, “Who’s the guy on the bench?” She stared at me for a second. “Kidding,” I said.

“At first, I thought it was Albert Einstein,” she said, “so it doesn’t surprise me when people don’t know.”


The only reason for time is so that everything doesn’t happen at once. — Einstein


I cannot imagine a God who rewards and punishes the objects of his creation, whose purposes are modeled after our own — a God, in short, who is but a reflection of human frailty. — Albert Einstein


Happy Birthday, E = mc2

25 Nov 2005 /
Albert Einstein

E = mc2, the world’s most famous equation, is 100 years old. According to this BBC article:

Einstein showed in a handful of lines that as you accelerate an object, it not only gets faster, it also gets heavier.

That in turn makes further pushing less fruitful so that eventually nothing can be accelerated beyond the speed of light.

Continue reading Happy Birthday, E = mc2