EppsNet Archive: China

Olympics Update

I think the Chinese have an unfair advantage in the synchronized diving because they all look exactly alike. 😮 Read more →

Feb. 5, 1917: Immigration Act Passed Over Wilson’s Veto

On this date in 1917, Congress overrode President Woodrow Wilson’s veto of the previous week and passed the Immigration Act of 1917, which, among other provisions, introduced a period of near complete exclusion of Asian immigration to the United States. Not that life was a bed of roses for Asian immigrants before 1917. Asian laborers were sought out for demanding and dangerous railroad jobs involving explosives. The phrase “Chinaman’s chance,” meaning little to no chance at all, dates from this period. Asians were not allowed American citizenship and were frequent victims of hostility and violence with no legal recourse. For example, in 1854, George W. Hall was convicted of murdering a Chinese man. On appeal to the State Supreme Court the decision was overturned because all of the evidence against him was from Chinese individuals. According to the Supreme Court ruling, the Chinese “recogniz[ed] no laws … except through necessity,… Read more →

More People I’m Sick Unto Death Of: Angela Davis

I still believe that capitalism is the most dangerous kind of future we can imagine. — Angela Davis Alternatives to capitalism have resulted in shortages, famine, mass murder and societal collapse (cf., Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, the Soviet Union, Communist China, North Korea, Cuba, Libya, Venezuela … I could go on and on but I think we both get the point). Can anyone list a few capitalist countries where this has occurred? If not, what does the word “dangerous” mean in this context? Angela Davis is now 70 years old. Can anyone list a few well-known Angela Davis-style radicals who lived a long life in any of the aforementioned countries? Read more →

The Twenty-Six Malignant Gates

“Do not ride your bicycle around the corner,” the mother had told the daughter when she was seven. “Why not!” protested the girl. “Because then I cannot see you and you will fall down and cry and I will not hear you.” “How do you know I’ll fall?” whined the girl. “It is in a book, The Twenty-Six Malignant Gates, all the bad things that can happen to you outside the protection of this house.” “I don’t believe you. Let me see the book.” “It is written in Chinese. You cannot understand it. That is why you must listen to me.” “What are they, then?” the girl demanded. “Tell me the twenty-six bad things.” But the mother sat knitting in silence. “What twenty-six!” shouted the girl. The mother still did not answer her. “You can’t tell me anything because you don’t know! You don’t know anything!” And the girl ran… Read more →

Let Me Tell You What Really Happened

Let me tell you what really happened, the voice said. All those years you waited torpidly, like a sleepwalker, pulled and pushed about by others’ opinions, by external pressure, by your illusions, by the official rules you internalized. You were misled by your own frustration and passivity, believing that what you were not allowed to have was what your heart was destined to embrace. — Ha Jin, Waiting Read more →

Chinese Women Can Afford to be Picky

Via Steven Landsburg: China has one of the highest male-female sex ratios in the world. That means women can afford to be picky. Here are the requirements listed by a female graduate student seeking a mate on the Chinese equivalent of match.com: Never married Masters degree or more Not from Wuhan No rural I.D. card No only children No smokers No alcoholics No gamblers Taller than one hundred and seventy-two centimeters More than a year of dating before marriage Sporty Parents who are still together Annual salary over fifty thousand yuan Between twenty-six and thirty-two years of age Willing to guarantee eating at least four dinners at home per week At least two ex-girlfriends but no more than four No Virgos, no Capricorns Read more →

The Common Good

Therefore the Master says: I let go of the law, and people become honest. I let go of economics, and people become prosperous. I let go of religion, and people become serene. I let go all desire for the common good, and the good becomes common as grass. — Tao Te Ching Read more →

Hu’s on First

The Chinese delegation visiting the White House squared off against the Americans in a game of softball. The President of China played first base. Read more →

Other Than That . . .

The social fabric is fraying. Human capital is being squandered. Society is segmenting. The labor markets are ill. Wages are lagging. Inequality is increasing. The nation is overconsuming and underinnovating. China and India are surging. —David Brooks, New York Times Point taken. But other than that, things are going okay, right? Read more →

Obama in China

Obama’s strongest comments during the town hall were directed at China’s Internet controls. “I’m a big supporter of non-censorship,” Obama said. . . . Chinese bloggers who saw it were grateful that he addressed censorship, but many zeroed in on what they considered Obama’s waffling language. “Learn English from Obama: Instead of saying ‘I want to eat,’ say ‘I am a big supporter of non-hunger,’” Wang Pei, a writer based in eastern China’s Hangzhou, twittered on Tuesday. — China govt pleased but ordinary folk cool on Obama Read more →

Cash for Clunkers

Cash for Clunkers has the following elements of spectacle: Americans destroying perfectly functional cars Americans whose skills are uncompetitive in the global marketplace driving around in fancy new cars Somewhere in China and India they must be having a good laugh. — Philip Greenspun Read more →

Chivalry is Dead

A man has died after catching his girlfriend as she jumped from the seventh floor of an apartment block in China. The young Chinese man, identified only by the surname Wang, held out his arms to break the woman’s fall as she plummeted from their apartment in Quanzhou in south-eastern China. Mr Wang was killed by the impact of his girlfriend landing on top of him, while the woman suffered bone fractures and other serious injuries but was not in critical condition. — PerthNow Read more →

Hu’s on First

“No, my man, I be askin’ you who set to offer Pakistan nuclear plants.” Read more →

Hu’s on First

Hu Becomes Undisputed Leader of China — Associated Press I’m askin’ you who becomes undisputed leader of China . . . Read more →